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Dear Fellow Supporters,

The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance has played an important role in our community for the past 32 years. Originally named the Holocaust Memorial Center and located on the ground floor of the Jewish Community Center, our mission was to keep alive the memory of those lost in the Holocaust. Today, our mission has expanded to include teaching the history of the Holocaust, and advancing human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference.

The Museum is currently in a rental location and no longer able to meet the demand of 80,000+ annual visitors from Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Because of these severe space constraints, our board has launched a campaign to build a state-of-the-art, 50,000 square foot permanent home in the historic West End, the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum. This new Museum, with its dramatically larger facilities and expanded educational and
cultural programming, will galvanize the North Texas community to learn the lessons of the Holocaust to combat hatred and injustice.

Today we are at a crossroads. Thank you for helping us take the next step in our journey to be able to teach more teachers, educate more students, and ultimately transform Dallas into a city of Upstanders.

With great appreciation,
Campaign Cabinet Members of the "Building a Foundation of Hope” Campaign:
Co-chairs

Rebecca Fletcher Frank Risch Ron Steinhart

Members: Kenny Goldberg, Tom Halsey, Jim Hogue, Hylton Jonas, Stan Rabin, Larry Schoenbrun, Florence Shapiro, and Steve Waldman.
October 2016

At the outbreak of World War II, many African Americans rushed to enlist. They were determined to fight to preserve the freedom they themselves had been denied. Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII tells the story.

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII

The exhibit highlights African American achievements and struggles during World War II both abroad and at home and explores how the war served as a catalyst for the Civil Rights Movement. It includes personal accounts of those who served, including an eight-minute video on the Tuskegee Airmen.

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII ,was produced by The National World War II Museum. All rights reserved. National Touring Sponsors: Abbot Downing & Wells Fargo.

Family Days/FREE Admission
Sunday, November 12, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, December 10, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, January 14, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII was produced by The National World War II Museum. All rights reserved. National Touring Sponsors: Abbot Downing & Wells Fargo.

Other related programming:
Speaker: Dr. Graham Cox | Topic: Jim Crow Laws and the Nuremberg Trials
Thursday, September 28, 2017 | at the Museum, 6:30 p.m.
Dr. Graham Cox, Lecturer in the History Department at the University of North Texas, will discuss how U.S. policymakers were able to seek
justice for the Holocaust at the Nuremberg trials without addressing racial inequality at home. Free. RSVP required through Eventbrite.

Film Screening: The Tuskegee Airmen | Thursday, November 30, 2017 at the Museum, 6:30 p.m.
Join us for a screening of HBO’s The Tuskegee Airmen starring Laurence Fishburne. This film is based on the story of the groundbreaking Tuskegee Airmen unit, the first African American combat pilots in the U.S. Army Air Corps, who fought in World War II.
Free. RSVP required through Eventbrite.

Exhibit Sponsors: Fox Rothschild LLP, Dallas Tourism Public Improvement District, and City of Dallas Office of Cultural Affairs.

Community Partners: African American Museum, Bishop Arts Theater Center, Claude R. Platte DFW Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen,
Dallas Civil Rights Museum, Dallas County Community College District, Eastfield College History Department, Holy Cross Catholic Church, Paul Quinn College, St. Paul United Methodist Church, Saint Paul Methodist Church, St. Philip’s School and Community Center, Texas Center for African American Studies at University of Texas at Arlington, University of North Texas, Veterans Resource Center, and Wilshire Baptist Church

Media Partners: Albert Outdoor Advertising, Efrogs-Short trip shuttle service, GospelConnection.com and KHVN Radio.

The exhibit will run through January 26, 2018.

Construction will commence immediately on the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

Groundbreaking for New Museum-Watch the Video

On Monday morning, 10/10/17, led by local Holocaust survivors and Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings, the Dallas Holocaust Museum broke ground today on a new, iconic 51,000 square-foot museum in downtown Dallas, realizing a 40-year dream that will teach and inspire new generations to advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference.

Video of Groundbreaking 10.10.17

Click here

Scheduled to open in the summer of 2019, the new state-of-the-art facility will be called the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum and will be unique among the nation’s 21 Holocaust-related museums with an expanded examination of the Holocaust featuring dozens of video testimonies from Dallas area survivors, along with new, in-depth technology-enriched exhibits on other genocides, human rights issues, and American ideals.

Construction will commence immediately on the new museum, at 300 N. Houston Street in Dallas’ historic West End district, which will quadruple its current size, accommodate more than double the number of current visitors—half of whom will be school students—and feature a Cinemark XD 250-seat theater, two classrooms, a temperature-controlled library and archive, and a special reflection and memorial area for visitors over three floors.

Given the increase in global, national, and local incidents of terrorist attacks, anti-Semitism, hate speech, and hate crimes, the creation of the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum has never been more critical or relevant. According to the Anti-Defamation League (ADL), 2016 was the second deadliest year for domestic extremist-related deaths in the United States since 1970—the first year ADL began recording the statistic.

“We need a place that allows us to discuss human rights, diversity, respect for others, and what that means for our city today,” said Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings. “The new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum will be that place. It will become a forum, right here in Dallas, to discuss the effects of hatred and how we as a community, united by understanding and acceptance, can counteract a dangerous history.”

Thanks to the tremendous work of the capital campaign chairs, Rebecca Fletcher, Frank Risch, and Ron Steinhart, the Museum met its $61 million goal and announced that it is extending its fundraising campaign to raise an additional $10 million, or a total of $71 million, to ensure institutional excellence by enhancing educational programming, hosting additional special exhibits, as well as funding for more teacher training, scholarships for students, programs fostering civil discourse and acceptance, technology upgrades, and ensuring its long-term financial stability.

“We are heartened by the tremendous support of our community and incredible donors to make this big dream a reality,” said Mary Pat Higgins, Museum President and CEO. “With our initial goal met to enable the start of construction, we are emboldened to expand our campaign to raise additional funding for enhanced educational programing and to ensure excellence in the years to come.”

Campaign Co-Chair Frank Risch said, “Achieving this major milestone of raising $61M ensures that we can build this new museum. Now, it’s time for us to continue fundraising to ensure long-term institutional excellence and financial sustainability for this first-class educational institution for which this community can be proud. With all that is going on in our world today, the need for such a facility, with its extensive educational programming, has never been greater.”

With the growing need for additional educational programming, the Museum’s expanded goal ensures excellence in the following area for decades to come:

• World-class, Holocaust and human rights-related special exhibitions
• Scholarship funds to ensure access to all students in North Texas
• Compelling programs that will foster civil discourse and acceptance of all people
• An education resource center for Texas and the surrounding states, providing curriculum training to teach difficult but all too relevant subject matters in an accurate and age-appropriate manner
• Adequate funding to maintain the facility and refresh and enhance the permanent exhibition and technology on an ongoing basis to provide a first-class visitor experience

“The new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum will allow us to serve more students, teachers, and visitors than ever before, which is critical to our mission,” said Florence Shapiro, Board Chair. “Our goal, through education, is to overcome prejudice, bigotry, intolerance, and the suffering they cause.” The programs will include student outreach, curriculum for teachers, special events, and hosting prominent speakers. Independent research has shown that student attitudes and levels of tolerance are strongly impacted by visits to the Museum, and teachers have reported positive changes in student behavior following a Museum experience.

Ann and Nate Levine, major campaign donors, explained, “Hatred is spreading across the globe and targeting the most vulnerable, making it critical for institutions like the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum to teach children and adults a peaceful and tolerant approach to social interaction.”

In recognizing the contributions of the 20 local Holocaust Survivors at the groundbreaking ceremony, Mayor Rawlings proclaimed October 10th, 2017, “Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Day” in Dallas, and thanked the survivors for their service and devotion to Dallas and the nation.

OMNIPLAN Architects of Dallas designed the new building; the permanent exhibition is being designed by Berenbaum Jacobs Associates, under the stewardship of Michael Berenbaum, the former Project Director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum on the Washington DC Mall; the general contractor is Austin Commercial.

Campaign Gifts of $500,000 or more as of print date:

$10 Million: Ann and Nate Levine

$3 Million: Carol and Steve Aaron

$2 Million:
The Brown Family;
W.W. Caruth, Jr. Foundation at Communities Foundation of Texas

$1 Million: Anonymous (1); Edward and Wilhelmina Ackerman Family Foundation; Alon USA Energy, Inc.; Janet and Jeffrey Beck; Cinemark USA, Inc.; Feldman Foundation TX; The Funk Family; Estate of Lilian Furst; Glazer Family; Lisa and Neil Goldberg; Sherry and Ken Goldberg; The Haymann Family; The Hirsch Family Foundation;
Lieberman-Dell Family; Louis and Arlene Navias Foundation; Barbara and Stan Rabin; Frank and Helen Risch; Simmons Sisters Fund of the Dallas Foundation;
Weinreb, Glick, and Pearlman Families; Herb and Donna Weitzman; and Mark and Peggy Zilbermann

$750,000: Hillcrest Foundation

$500,000:
American Airlines, Diane and Hal Brierley; The Crystal Charity Ball; Drs. Lisa and David Genecov; Elizabeth and Tom Halsey; Hamon Charitable Foundation; Lyda Hill; Hoblitzelle Foundation; The Meadows Foundation; Paul and Lee Michaels, The Moody Foundation; Katherine and Eric Reeves; Betty Regard; Deedie Rose; Larry and Celia Schoenbrun; Marianne and Roger Staubach; and M.B. & Edna Zale Foundation

Hope for Humanity Honoring Lauren Embrey

Tuesday, October 24, 2017,
Fairmont Dallas, 1717 N Akard St, Dallas 75201 (The Regency Ballroom),
6:00 p.m. Cocktails; 7:00 p.m. Welcome and Dinner; 8:00 p.m. Program begins.
Hope for Humanity is more than the Dallas Holocaust Museum’s largest fundraiser. It is an inspirational evening dedicated to honoring our local Holocaust survivors and paying tribute to an Upstander whose actions personify the Museum’s mission to teach the history of the Holocaust and to advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference.

DINNER CO-CHAIRS: Trea C. Yip and Sarah M. Losinger
HONORARY CHAIRS: Barbara and Stan Rabin
Michelle Anderson | Rebecca Bruder | Kelly Hoglund Compton | Rebecca Fletcher | Don Glendenning | Dr. Rick Halperin | Helen LaKelly Hunt and Harville Hendrix | Lynn and Allan McBee | Karol Omlor | Barbara and Stan Rabin | Frank Risch | Barbara Glazer Rosenblatt | Joanne and Charles Teichman

ABOUT LAUREN EMBREY
Lauren Embrey believes that every day provides a new opportunity to become the meaningful change we desire to see in the world, and it starts with a look inside ourselves. “Each one of us can be part of the solution,” says Lauren, “and it starts by understanding our biases and the language we use.” CLICK HERE to read more ...

WHY SUPPORT HOPE FOR HUMANITY?
Net revenue from Hope for Humanity supports the mission, special exhibits, and year-round educational programming and community outreach initiatives of the Dallas Holocaust Museum. The Museum does more than most history museums. Here, we inspire students to consider the real consequences of their choices. We open minds, one student at a time. We challenge them to think critically and become Upstanders. CLICK HERE to read more ...

JOIN US!
This dinner sells out each year, so make your reservation soon! CLICK HERE to download the TABLE SPONSORSHIP CONTRACT. It includes a listing of all levels and associated benefits. Or CLICK HERE to make your ONLINE PURCHASE now.

Single tickets will not be available until after August 31. Email Events@DallasHolocaustMuseum.org if you wish to be added to a mailing list for single tickets. (Limited availability)

For more information, email Events@DallasHolocaustMuseum.org or call 469-399-5202.

We urge the global community to insist that the government and military of Myanmar reverse their long practice of discrimination and violence against the Rohingya and treat them as all people deserve to be treated--as human beings.

Tel: (202) 332-3344, (202) 332-4250, Fax (202) 332-4351
Email:pyi.thayar@yahoo.com

Museum's Public Statement on Behalf of the Rohingya

The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance is gravely concerned for the Rohingya people in Myanmar and will not be silent as hatred and violence against this Muslim ethnic minority continue to escalate. Conditions for the Rohingya in Myanmar have been difficult for many years but have worsened dramatically since a savage military crack-down against them began on August 25th, 2017. In response, more than 370,000 Rohingya have fled into Bangladesh in the past month.

We call upon the government of Myanmar, and Aung San Suu Kyi as the effective head of state, to end the denial of human rights, and the persecution and murder of Rohingya men, women, and children.

We urge the global community to insist that the government and military of Myanmar reverse their long practice of discrimination and violence against the Rohingya and treat them as all people deserve to be treated--as human beings.

We make this statement as part of our mission to teach the history of the Holocaust and advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference. We urge all people to be Upstanders and contact Myanmar's Ambassador to the United States at:

Tel: (202) 332-3344, (202) 332-4250, Fax (202) 332-4351
Email:pyi.thayar@yahoo.com

Jim Crow and the Nuremberg Trials

Speaker: Dr. Graham Cox | Topic: Jim Crow Laws and the Nuremberg Trials
Thursday, September 28, 2017 | at the Museum, 6:30 p.m.
Dr. Graham Cox, Lecturer in the History Department at the University of North Texas, will discuss how U.S. policymakers were able to seek
justice for the Holocaust at the Nuremberg trials without addressing racial inequality at home. Free. RSVP required through Eventbrite.

North Texas Giving Day is on Thursday, September 14! Give $25 or more to the Dallas Holocaust Museum through NorthTexasGivingDay.org between 6 a.m. and midnight and your donation will qualify for a bonus gift from Communities Foundation of Texas.

CAN'T WAIT? DONATE NOW!
If you'd prefer to donate early, you can visit NorthTexasGivingDay.org, select the Dallas Holocaust Museum, and submit your donation. Your gift will be processed on Thursday, September 14, and it will count toward the total amount raised on #NTxGivingDay.

WhyIGive #EverydayUpstanders

Waived Admissions: For people displaced in the wake of Harvey; valid through September 30, 2017. Must be redeemed in person at the Museum.

Free Family Days: Offer valid on specific days and times only. See below.


Announcing Waived Admission for Persons Displaced by Harvey and Free Family Days for All

Hurricane Harvey Free General Admission Offer details:
Offer valid at the front desk and must be used on of day of redemption.
Offer valid for those with proof of residency and up to 7 immediate family members attending the Museum with the qualified individual. 
No refunds on free admission.
Offer cannot be redeemed without valid proof of residency and corresponding valid photo ID.
The Museum reserves the right to change, modify, or decline this offer at any time.
Parking not included.

Family Days/FREE Admission details
Sunday, September 10, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, October 15, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, November 11, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, December 10, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Sunday, January 14, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The death of three innocent people is utterly reprehensible.

MUSEUM’S STATEMENT AGAINST THE HATRED, BIGOTRY AND VIOLENCE IN CHARLOTTESVILLE

The Dallas Holocaust Museum remembers a time when Aryan racist ideology led to the murder of six million Jews, as well as the persecution and murder of millions of other victims.

While we strongly support freedom of speech and expression, we are alarmed by the growth of white supremacists in our country. The messages of hatred and racial bigotry, and the glorification of Nazi ideology and paraphernalia, promoted by the “Unite the Right” protest in Charlottesville should serve as a call to action for us all. That it ended in the death of three innocent people is utterly reprehensible. We must strive to live up to the incredible ideals of liberty, justice and equality on which our great country was founded, and we must do so without resorting to violence.

We abhor hatred and bigotry in all its forms and urge all citizens to recognize both as unacceptable and destructive. We call upon the public to unite in condemnation of xenophobic rhetoric and actions, to find common ground, and to promote civil discourse and mutual understanding.

To learn more about the Holocaust, please visit the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance. Our mission is to teach the history of the Holocaust to advance human rights and combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference.

Visit Our Blog. Also note: Enlisted Military Visit the Museum-Free.

The Upstander Connection offers a visitors view Museum events, artifacts, and exhibitions.
Visit the Upstander Connection Blog.

The Dallas Holocaust Museum is a Blue Star Museum. Blue Star Museums is a collaboration among the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense, and more than 2,000 museums across America to offer free admission to the nation’s active duty military personnel including National Guard and Reserve and their families from Memorial Day, May 29, through Labor Day, September 4, 2017.

Survivor Speakers-July

Summer Survivor Speakers Series
Wednesday, July 19, and Sunday, July 23, 2017 |
the Museum, 12:30 p.m.

Wednesday, July 19th - Paul Kessler
Sunday, July 23, 2017 - Rosa Blum ( TENTATIVE )

Join us to hear the testimonies of Holocaust survivors, refugees, and
hidden children, as well as survivors of modern-day genocides.
Free. Admission fees for Museum exhibits apply.

Building a Foundation of Hope

In October of 2016, we announced our Capital Campaign to build a larger and state-of-the-art museum, with an expanded mission and scope--the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum.
Media Contact:
Paula Nourse
Director of Marketing and Communications
O: 469.399.5201 or M: 214.906.8314

Dallas Holocaust Museum to Build New
State-of-the-Art Museum in Downtown Dallas

The Museum will have a new name—Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum—and an expanded mission to teach the history of the Holocaust and advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference at a time when Texas leads the nation in the number of active hate groups.

The new 50,000-square-foot museum will accommodate more than 200,000 visitors a year, and more than quadruple its exhibition space.

PRESS RELEASE
DALLAS, Oct. 27, 2016—The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance today announced that it will build a new permanent home in the West End Historic District of downtown Dallas.

The new museum will bear a new name – the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum – and an expanded mission. It will be built on property owned by the Museum near Houston Street and the DART Rail corridor on Pacific Avenue, presently a parking lot, diagonally across from the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza.

“At a time when Texas leads the nation in the number of active hate groups, and the Dallas community is still healing from the July 7th attack on local law enforcement officers, the most violent and hateful act against law enforcement officers since 9/11, we believe the mission of the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum is more important than ever,” said Museum President and CEO Mary Pat Higgins.

“The Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum will become an architectural icon in downtown Dallas, engaging 21st century audiences by dramatically expanding educational programming,” said Frank Risch, Campaign Co-chair. “The state-of-the-art, 50,000-square-foot museum will accommodate more than 200,000 visitors a year, half of whom will be school students. It will also more than quadruple its current exhibit space,” he said.

The new museum is being designed by Omniplan Architects and the permanent exhibition is being designed by Berenbaum Jacobs Associates, under the stewardship of Michael Berenbaum, the former Project Director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum on the Washington D.C. Mall.

The new museum will be unique among the nation’s 21 Holocaust-related museums. In addition to a clear focus on the Holocaust, it will feature new exhibit galleries on human rights and American ideals. It will also feature modern, immersive and interactive content and technology along with an original boxcar used by the Nazis during the Holocaust to transport Jews and others. It will include a 250-seat theater, new classrooms, an expanded library and archive, modern technology throughout, additional staffing, and a special reflection and memorial area for visitors.

“We need a place that allows us to have a discussion about what human rights, diversity, and respect for others mean for our city today,” said Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings.

The Museum has already raised two thirds of the funds it needs to start construction, which will take about two years to complete. More than $43 million has been raised of the $61 million budget. To raise additional funds, the Museum is launching the “Building a Foundation of Hope” capital campaign. Construction will begin as soon as remaining needed funds are raised, Higgins said.

“We have run out of space in our tiny current rented facility,” said Higgins. “We are limited in the number of visitors we can see at one time, and many schools and thousands of students are not able to visit as their class sizes are too large for our current museum. We have been forced to move many of our events to other venues. These are all wonderful problems to have, but we urgently have to address our community’s need for education surrounding the history of the Holocaust and its all too relevant lessons. This need has led our board to unanimously approve the ‘Building a Foundation of Hope’ capital campaign to create the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum.”

Ann and Nate Levine, the new museum’s most generous donors, have stated that “Education is at the heart of everything the Museum does. Our goal is to change behavior by raising awareness of the dangers of prejudice, hatred, and injustice and what happens when people don’t stand up to threats against humanity.” The Levines also note that “the new museum will focus on Upstanders—those individuals who stand up to prejudice, hatred, and indifference—and whose efforts inspire us to make a difference in our community and world.”

The Museum recently commissioned an independent academic study to gauge the impact that a visit to the Museum has on students and educators. The results make very clear that student attitudes and tolerance levels are strongly impacted by Museum visits:
• Understanding that passive actions/bystander behavior have negative impacts increased by 56.8% for middle school and 31.1% for high school students
• Capacity to examine their own behaviors increased by 19.4% in middle school and 15.7% in high school students
• 83.3% of teachers said students are more willing to stand up for others
Roger Staubach, former Dallas Cowboys quarterback, honoree of the Museum’s 2010 Hope for Humanity award dinner, and long-time Museum supporter, says “We need to take the next step for all the people of Dallas to be able to teach more teachers, to educate more students, and ultimately transform Dallas into a city of Upstanders. This new museum will continue to showcase Dallas as a beacon of hope for our nation and our world.”

The Museum has played an important role in the community for the past 32 years. The new museum, with its dramatically larger facilities and expanded educational and cultural programming, will galvanize North Texans to learn and understand the lessons of the Holocaust, thereby combating hatred and injustice.

The Museum is grateful for the following leadership gifts to the “Building a Foundation of Hope” campaign to create the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum (as of print date):

Capital Campaign Donors Include:

$1,000,0000-$2,999,999: Edward and Wilhelmina Ackerman Family Foundation; Alon USA Energy, Inc.; Janet and Jeffrey Beck; The Brown Family; Cinemark; Cynthia and Robert Feldman; Funk Families; Estate of Lilian Furst; Glazer Family; Lisa and Neil Goldberg; Sherry and Kenny Goldberg; Dot and Basil Haymann; The Hirsch Family Foundation; Helen and Frank Risch; Simmons Sisters Fund; Donna and Herbert Weitzman; Peggy and Mark Zilbermann; $3,000,0000-$4,999,999: Carol and Steve Aaron; $10,000,000: Ann and Nate Levine.

To learn more about the “Building a Foundation of Hope” capital campaign, please contact Mary Pat Higgins at (214) 741-7500. For additional information about the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum, please visit: DallasHolocaustMuseum.org.

About the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance
The Dallas Holocaust Museum’s mission is to teach the history of the Holocaust and advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference. The Museum’s educational and cultural programs have a profound effect on people of all ages. In 2016, over 80,000 visitors will tour the Museum. Many write that their lives have been transformed by the experience. Our exhibits and programs convey the lessons of the Holocaust including the horrors brought on by unchecked discrimination and deep-rooted hatred which led to the attempted annihilation of the Jews and the systematic persecution of others. Visitors also learn about human and civil rights, their centrality to our democracy, and their vital importance in preventing events like those of the Holocaust from happening again.

The Museum is located at 211 N. Record Street, Dallas, Texas 75202. Hours are Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, please visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org or call (214) 741-7500.

iRead Book Club: Number the Stars by Lois Lowery
Noon at the Museum

IRead Book Club

iRead Book Club: Number the Stars by Lois Lowery

Monday, June 5, 2017 at the Museum, 12:00 p.m.
Join us as we read books that move us and explore key literary and
historical points. This month, we will discuss Number the Stars by
Lois Lowry. Open to Museum members and volunteers.
Free. RSVP to cdecoster@dallasholocaustmuseum.org.

Upstander Speaker Series 2017

Upstander Speaker: Dr. Mehnaz Afridi | May 10, 2017 | Director of Holocaust, Genocide and Inter Faith Center, Educator, Author| Location TBD
Dr. Afridi’s research aims to understand the relations between Muslims, Jews, and Christians and to promote an open interfaith dialogue between them. Raised in Western Europe and the Middle East, Dr. Afridi is a Muslim whose curiosity led her to question the reasons behind the racial and political tensions she witnessed between Jews and Muslims. Unfamiliar with the Holocaust, she studied under her professor during a teaching assistantship, and then delved further to learn about Judaism, the Holocaust, and the role of Muslims, Islamophobia and antisemitism. Her studies led her to Israel where she began interviewing Holocaust survivors to hear their stories and hardships. Dr. Afridi currently serves as Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and the Director of the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College. Many of her publications focus on how her contemporaries expressed antisemitism. Her forthcoming book, Shoah Through Muslim Eyes, is based on her personal and academic journey into Judaism as a Muslim.

Upstander Speaker: Dr. Samantha Nutt | November 9, 2017 | Medical Doctor, Humanitarian, Author, Founder of War Child Canada and War Child USA | Location TBD
As a recent medical-school graduate in 1995, Dr. Nutt found work as a field volunteer with UNICEF in Baidoa, Somalia, alias “city of death.” Impassioned and emboldened by what she witnessed there, Dr. Nutt began her lifetime career as an advocate for children’s and women’s rights in major war zones around the world. From Iraq to Afghanistan, Somalia to the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Syria to Darfur, Sudan, Dr. Nutt has been on the frontlines of the world’s major conflict zones, and her work has helped thousands of children affected by war. Damned Nations: Greed, Guns, Armies, and Aid, Dr. Nutt’s critically-acclaimed debut book is a #1 bestseller. It combines original research with personal stories that span her career of hands-on care with children and families impacted by violence. She did this while founding the renowned global humanitarian organizations War Child Canada and War Child USA. A leading authority on war, current affairs and international policy, Dr. Nutt is one of the most fearless and recognized humanitarian speakers in the field.

Mary Pat Higgins: Building a Foundation of Hope!

Dear Visitors and Friends of the Museum,

The Museum's mission, to teach the history of the Holocaust and to advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference, has never been more relevant. You need only think about the tragic violence in Charlottesville and the recent violence in Berkeley to understand the importance of our work.

Today, we are at a crossroads. Our community’s needs and desires for the education and training we provide far exceed the Museum’s resources to deliver them. Simply put, we are out of space in our current 6,000 square-foot leased facility.

This past year, we had a record number of visitors…more than 83,000! And, almost half of them were students in grades 6-12. But the Museum can only serve 240 students at a time in our current exhibition area, greatly limiting the number of schools we can accommodate each day. Our theater is standing-room-only for most of our community programs, Holocaust survivor talks, and education events.

To meet the demand from schools who wish to visit us but cannot due to our inadequate physical space, the Museum’s board has approved the “Building a Foundation of Hope” campaign to create a new 50,000 square foot state-of-the-art permanent home and education center in the West End Historic District of downtown Dallas—the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum.

This new facility will allow us to reach more than 200,000 visitors a year—half of whom will be students—and dramatically expand our educational content for the students of our region. The 17,000 sq. ft. permanent exhibition will start with the Holocaust, a paradigm of state sponsored hatred, terror and mass murder. We will then explore three major developments that were taken following World War II in an attempt to prevent something like the Holocaust from ever happening again – The Nuremberg Trials, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the Convention on the Prevention of Genocide.

Next, visitors will learn about the ten stages of genocide, using documented genocidal activity as examples, so they will be able to understand when we are at risk of allowing another genocide to occur. And finally, we will explore the evolution of civil and human rights in our great democracy, celebrating the Upstanders who have fought for change to help us live up to our incredible ideals – that all people are created equal.
The exhibition experience will culminate with a Call to Action – to encourage our visitors to look beyond themselves and get involved in our community to help others – to become Upstanders!

The new Museum will also include:
• A large, flexible space for rotating special exhibits;
• 2 high-tech classrooms available for educational workshops, after-hours enrichment, and summer camps;
• A 250-seat state-of-the-art theater and auditorium that will allow the Museum to show mission-relevant films and host speakers and panel discussions;
• A Reflection and Memorial Area where students and teachers can absorb and discuss the impact of their visit;
• And a climate-controlled Archive and Library.

The new Museum is not a luxury, it is a necessity. And, we owe it to our local Survivors to complete their dream—of a lasting, living, memorial to the Holocaust and an ongoing testament to human rights—to create new generations of Upstanders.

Four years ago, we launched the “Building a Foundation of Hope” campaign to build the new Museum. I’m proud to say that, to date, we’ve raised $57.3 million!

Very soon, we will announce a fall date for our groundbreaking. Each of you will be invited…and we hope you will be there to watch as the new building emerges over the next two years.

Then, we want you to join us to celebrate the grand opening of the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum during the summer of 2019—what is certain to be a great day for humanity!
Sincerely,

Mary Pat Higgins
President and CEO

Sincerely,

Mary Pat Higgins
President and CEO

Film Screening: Sunday, March 26. 2 p.m. @ Museum December 7th (Pearl Harbor)

Film Screening: December 7th
Sunday, March 26, 2017 | at the Museum, 2:00 p.m.
As a follow-up to our screening of They Were Expendable, we will
feature John Ford’s Academy Award-winning propaganda film,
December 7th. Parts of the original film were considered unpatriotic
and edited out; we will show the original, uncensored version.
Free, RSVP required through Eventbrite.

Dallas Holocaust Museum Presents April 19, 1943: One Day in the Holocaust
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | at Museum at 2:00 p.m.
Join us as we bring attention to April 19, 1943, the focal point of the Museum’s core exhibit. The event will feature a talk by Jack Repp, Holocaust survivor, and light refreshments. This event is included in the cost of admission.

One Day During the Holocaust

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | at Museum at 2:00 p.m.
Join us as we bring attention to April 19, 1943, the focal point of the Museum’s core exhibit. The event will feature a talk by Jack Repp, Holocaust survivor, and light refreshments. This event is included in the cost of admission.

Summer 2017 Newsletter: Stan Levenson

FOLLOWING THE NEWS ON ANTISEMITISM AND HATRED

Stan Levenson is a widely recognized public relations professional whose career in Dallas spans over 45 years. While achieving a leadership role in the public relations profession, Mr. Levenson has dedicated several decades to community service, the arts and support for education. We have had the great fortune of benefitting from Stan’s wisdom, along with countless other organizations. Stan’s commitment to our community is unparalleled.

A former chairman of the Greater Dallas Chamber's marketing committee, Mr. Levenson has directed numerous civic initiatives, including the Mayor’s Task Force on Marketing Southern Dallas; chairing the grand opening of the African-American Museum at Fair Park; serving on the boards of the Dallas Arboretum and the North Texas Commission. He was a participating member of the President's Advisory Council of the AT&T Center for the Performing Arts and the Legacy Council at the Sammons Center for the Performing Arts, the Texas Trees, Thanks-Giving and Jewish Family Service Foundations.

Throughout his career, Mr. Levenson has been active on advisory boards at the University of North Texas’ College of Music; the University of Texas at Dallas’ School of Arts and Humanities and SMU’s Perkins School of Theology, and Communication Studies at Southern Methodist University. He was an adjunct professor and taught PR Management there.

In 2008, Levenson was selected to the North Texas Super Bowl XLV Host Committee by Chairman Roger Staubach and other board members and was past Chairman of the Urban League of Greater Dallas. Mr. Levenson served as a member of the board of the Dallas Holocaust Museum/ Center for Education and Tolerance for many years and remains on our Communications Committee advisory board. To that end, he regularly delivers articles he’s clipped that helps us stay aware of incidents of antisemitism as well as articles on topics related to our mission.

With his devoted wife and business partner Barbara, Stan Levenson takes great pride in being blessed with two gifted daughters and six grandsons, two of whom are college graduates.

Here are links to a few of the articles in his recent collection:

https://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/10492/anti-semitism-tolerance
http://www.dw.com/en/arte-defends-decision-on-european-anti-semitism-documentary/a-39162561
http://forward.com/opinion/374131/this-week-in-anti-semitism-arson-slurs-and-a-weaponized-basketball/
http://www.jpost.com/Diaspora/German-mayor-cancels-BDS-events-due-to-antisemitism-496202
http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/06/07/hate-anti-semitism-on-rise-at-alameda-schools-parents-say/
http://www.ejpress.org/article/Franco-German-tv-network-refuses-to-broadcast-documentary-on-the-rise-of-anti-Semitism-in-Europe/23301
http://www.haaretz.com/us-news/.premium-1.806454 (added not from Stan)

A Narrative Walk Through the New Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

The Narrative

Much is expected of the exhibits and galleries of a building meant to convey the horrors of the Holocaust, the justice of the Nuremberg Trials, the hope for humanity encapsulated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the International Genocide Convention, and the exceptional nature of American ideals, reality, and repair. These are precisely the expectations held for the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum as it helps fulfill the Museum’s mission to teach the history of the Holocaust and advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference.

The new Museum will deal with difficult, thought-provoking, crucial, and heart-wrenching moments in history. As the generation of Holocaust survivors dwindles, our mission is important now more than ever. This building will convey our mission, create a space for learning and exploration, and allow for reflection so visitors may fully comprehend the gravity of the information they have just taken in. The museum aims to transform the life of every visitor.

The 50,000 square foot building’s design is deliberate in the way that it leads visitors through the journey--a carefully choreographed sequence of spaces intended to remove the visitor from distractions so that the focus is solely on the exhibits.

The Museum's Courtyard is accessible--a part of the city, and, yet, a microcosm of its own: the visitor is aware of the Museum's messaging and education but is apart from it; the courtyard offers solace where visitors can collect their thoughts in anticipation of the journey. Floor to ceiling windows in the lobby provides a clear view of the courtyard allowing the transition to be seamless.

The lobby is a transitional space from the street, filled with natural light. The visitor is aware of the city but removed from its distractions. Here, the visitor may also enter the Special Exhibit Gallery, a flexible space that will host a variety of rotating special exhibits. Tall artifacts, floor or wall, mounted – or even suspended from the ceiling – will be housed in this dramatic room.

From the lobby, the Orientation Wing becomes the departure point to the journey through the exhibition rooms in the building.

The Holocaust/Shoah Wing is the first major exhibition space the visitor will experience. It encourages the visitor to focus on the history and inhumanity that were the horrors of the Holocaust and answers the question, how did this happen?

The Human Rights and Genocide Wing which includes the Human Rights Gallery and The Genocide Gallery, follows the Shoah section and demonstrates the efforts of humankind to learn the lessons of the Holocaust and to ensure that ‘never again’ is a true statement.

The Genocide Gallery which shows that these efforts are still a work-in-progress, as the 10 Stages of Genocide are illustrated through major art installations.
The last exhibition is the “Pivot to America Wing” which includes “American Ideals, American Realities, and the American Repair Gallery.” American Ideals, Reality, and Repair engages visitors with documents foundational to our nation and then explores the reality of life in America. This reality is tempered by efforts at repair undertaken by Americans as part of our democratic system, as envisioned by the founders. The visitor advances to the “call to action,” to embrace ideals, challenge reality, and participate in ongoing repair. The Museum provides the channels to take the first steps to become involved on a local or national level.

The journey culminates in the Reflection and Memorial Room that provides visitors with a serene space in which to reflect on Hope, Rebirth, and Faith, and to memorialize those who died during the Holocaust.

The Architecture
The architecture of the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum communicates the notion of the journey through the building and the exhibits. It is a dynamic structure, expressive of the physical and emotional experience, and movement from arrival to departure, with milestones along the way. Structurally, the building ensures an intuitive path for visitors so that the focus is on the experience, without distractions. The architecture is assertive and inviting. It is meant to fit in and to become a landmark in Dallas’ historic West End district.

The Context
The placement of the building on its site responds to a series of considerations: it creates a vibrant open urban space for the neighborhood, it allows for sunlight to reach the Museum. It is compatible with its neighbors--the tourist attractions nearby: the Sixth Floor Museum, Dealey Plaza, and the Old Red Court House. At the same time, the design complies with the City of Dallas and West End Historic District requirements. The building height, setbacks, materiality, lot coverage, parking counts, loading and trash collection zones are satisfactorily met and will not require variances or adjustments to the current zoning.

The Materials
With its exterior of copper cladding, which will acquire a natural patina over time, the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum will comply with the historic district requirements of masonry and metal façades.

Overcoming my implicit racial bias has been a process

Written by Lauren Embrey, Contributor

From as early as 3 months old, I was cared for by an African-American woman. Her name was Reggie Kelley. She stayed at the house all day through dinner and into the night if my parents had a party.

Reggie had two uniforms in the utility room closet: white for daytime and black for nighttime. Reggie's husband's name was Papa. Papa would come over to our house on those party evenings and leave with her. Reggie drove the old company Cadillac my dad gave her and she wouldn't let Papa drive it.
This one particular evening when I was in my 20s, I was riding with them, and I wanted Papa to sit in the front seat. I offered that to him, thinking it was very kind and forward-thinking of me. I wanted to show him we were equals.

Lauren Embrey and Reggie Kelley

He said, "No thank you, Miss Embrey." I asked him again, same answer, and again, with more persistence. Still "No." He sat in the back seat, behind me. I never understood why he said no.
Nearly 20 years later and early in my leadership at the Embrey Family Foundation, I attended a workshop on white privilege with the organization Race Forward. I knew I had cultural and societal advantages as a wealthy white woman, but I didn't know exactly how.

At this workshop, I first learned of implicit bias. Implicit bias refers to the ways of thinking and behaving that are taught to us as children, belief systems so deeply ingrained that,  even as adults, they steer our decisions and our behaviors at a level below conscious awareness.

As I reflected on this, I remembered what happened that night with Papa and told the facilitator. She didn't pause. "Of course he wouldn't, Lauren. If he had been caught sitting in the front seat with a white person behind him, he would have been lynched."

Papa Kelley and Reggie Kelley

Lynched? In the 1980s? But Papa grew up in the early 1900s; he lived through Jim Crow, the murder of Emmett Till, the violence that surrounded desegregation and the civil rights movement. I knew she was right. It was like someone punched me in the chest. How could I be so ignorant?

So I took Harvard University's Implicit Bias Test that measures the strength of associations between concepts (for example, black people, white people) and evaluations (good, bad, etc.). My result: a strong automatic preference for white people. With this new awareness of bias, I decided to change.
During the next few years, the Embrey Family Foundation initiated staff and community conversations, sought counsel from experts and refocused part of our financial commitment toward the work of racial equity. One of our most important investments was the 2013 launch of Dallas Faces Race. This forum brings together nonprofit organizations to actively build their capacity to address racial equity and collaborate to make change.

Race matters, and the way we talk about race matters now more than ever. We must change the narrative, the one learned as children, and the one that continues today. Each of us can be part of that solution, and it starts by understanding our biases and the words we use.

A few days ago, I took the implicit bias test again. My result: no automatic preference for one race over the other. This is a process; I was born in Texas in the 1950s, and I was brought up in the culture of that time. I know I must continue to challenge my innate belief systems to open my world.

Facing implicit bias is a journey that requires courage, honesty and love. Dallas is on this journey as well. Will you join us?

Lauren Embrey is the president of the Embrey Family Foundation and chief executive of Embrey Interests Ltd. in Dallas. She wrote this column for The Dallas Morning News. Website: embreyfdn.org

Tales From the Archives

The Dallas Holocaust Museum archival collection contains 11,000 items, including books, photographs, textiles, and letters. Significantly, we are actively collecting Holocaust-related artifacts and have recently expanded our collecting focus to include human rights materials.

Just last week the Museum Archivist, Felicia Williamson, met with the Carol Pinker family. They generously donated their maternal grandmother’s wedding dress to the Museum. Carol’s mother (Herta Traub) married Carol’s father (Karl Wolf) on February 16, 1936. Significantly, the family had previously donated Karl and Herta’s Ketubah, or wedding contract.

After experiencing the terror of Kristallnacht, Karl and Herta fled Nazi Germany. The Museum is so thrilled to add this important artifact to our collection!

Do you know of Holocaust or human rights collections in the Dallas area? Please contact the Archivist at archives@dallasholocaustmuseum.org with details!

Photograph of Herta Traub’s 1936 wedding dress and Ketubah

Carol Pinker Family Collections. Accessions 2016.242 and 2017.11

The Tribute Program

The Dallas Holocaust Museum Tribute Program allows donors to honor or memorialize a family member, friend or other loved one. Donations allow us to teach the history of the Holocaust and advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred and prejudice. Below are the names of the donors who participated in the tribute program from May through July 2017 along with those they have chosen to recognize. Tributes are listed alphabetically by honoree.

GIFTS IN CELEBRATION OF

Aaron Bard’s Bar Mitzvah from Tamar and Arthur Leventhal
Sara Bassichis’ Bat Mitzvah from Tamar and Arthur Leventhal
Leslie Bell's Bat Mitzvah from Cheryl and Paul Gardner
Joshua Brown's Birthday from Lorraine and Sidney Brown
Irma Freudenreich’s 100th Birthday from Marcie Feiger and Family, and Helen Stern
Matthew Genecov's Graduation from Terry and Dennis Darryl
Megan Genecov's Graduation from Terry and Dennis Darryl
Hannah Gershenson’s Bat Mitzvah from Tamar and Arthur Leventhal
Tori Gervis’ Bat Mitzvah from Tamar and Arthur Leventhal
Jimmy Ray’s Bar Mitzvah from Tamar and Arthur Leventhal
Helen Risch's Bat Mitzvah from Katherine and Warren Krause, and Carol and Richard Minker
Jacob Robinowitz Bar Mitzvah from Tamar and Arthur Leventhal
Selma Sherman's Birthday from Zach Kleiman
Herb Weitzman's Birthday from Kimberly Flynn

GIFTS IN HONOR OF

Max Glauben from The Meadows Foundation, and the Jill and Benton Middleman Family
Katherine and Stuart Reeves from Richard Eiseman
Jack Repp from Chabad of Frisco
Terry and Bert Romberg from Jackson Hole Jewish Community
Ron Steinhart from Josh Feferman
Charles Teichman from Alysa Teichman

GIFTS IN MEMORY OF

Edward Ackerman from Blair Wylie
Robert Cohen from Harriet L. Levine
Helen Cremer Fogel from Elaine Brooks, Myra and Bert Fischel, Ynette and Jim Hogue, Susan and Alan Klein, Carol and 
Mark Kreditor, Margot Okowita, Daphne and David Sydney, and Phyllis Trigg
Bob Greenspan from Phyllis and Bill Carroll
Murray Hoffer from Jackie and Stephen Waldman
Agnes Hoffman from Hollie and Brian Choate, Helen and Thomas Dunlap, Elizabeth Kummer, Marianne and Bruce Rosenstein, and Margaret and John Veatch
Shirley Hoppenstein from Jackie and Stephen Waldman
Barbara Jeffery from Jackie and Stephen Waldman
Edward Kleiman from Jackie and Stephen Waldman
Doris Levine from Jackie and Stephen Waldman
Kenny Osschwanger from Lynn and A. Jay Staub
John Raphael from AWH Capital, L.P. and Corinne Nassen
Lena Rothschild from the Honorable Florence and Howard Shapiro
Paula Rudnick from Tasca and Neal Feibel
Max Schiff from the Honorable Florence and Howard Shapiro, and Cynthia and Stuart Spechler
Esther Gold Stein from Jackie and Stephen Waldman
Fred Strauss from Rhonda and Art Diamond, Sherry and Ken Goldberg, and Linda and Larry Levey

To make a tribute gift, please call 214 741-7500 or visit dallasholocaustmuseum.org/support

From Filming the Camps to Fighting for the Right

Blog and Newsletter Article: From Filming to Fighting
By: Capri Jordan

The Hollywood directors showcased in Filming the Camps, the Museums special exhibit that ran from February 16th through August 3rd, helped American civilians of the time period understand the full complexities of the war and the Holocaust. As well as assisting the American public, the film and photography captured were also an important factor during the post-war trials. As Ford noted: “Human memory is faulty…it is important that a contemporary record be made of the event…that will constitute…proof...”

Beginning in September 2017, the Museum will present the new special gallery exhibit, Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII.

In 1896, Plessy vs. Ferguson held in favor of racial segregation, maintaining that public institutions were to be kept “separate but equal.” Almost 45 years later, this system was still prevalent in much of America. In the south, segregation was embodied in the Jim Crow laws.

Executive Order 8802, issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1942, opened war industries to African American workers. However, black soldiers were still segregated from their white counterparts, often forced to work non-combat jobs (as cooks, logistics, stewards, etc.) without proper training. Despite segregation and other obstacles, many African Americans joined the war effort. As American soldiers fought against Nazi ideology, institutionalized prejudice flourished at home. The new exhibit, Fighting for the Right to Fight, uncovers the struggles African Americans faced when trying to fight in WWII.

African Americans joined the war effort hoping to inspire change in America. The Double V Campaign, which spread like wildfire in black communities, called for a victory overseas and a victory for American minorities at home. It began in 1942 when a black man from Wichita, Kansas wrote to The Pittsburgh Courier:

Should I sacrifice my life to live half American?…[Is it] too much to demand full citizenship rights in exchange for the sacrificing of my life? Is the…America I know worth defending? Will America be a true and pure democracy after this war?...I suggest that while we keep defense and victory in the forefront that we don't lose sight of our fight for true democracy at home.–James G. Thompson.

After the war, African Americans expected improvements in society, but conditions remained stagnant. Over the next decade, racial tensions grew. Brown vs. Board of Education (1954) which banned segregation in public schools led to the official start of the Civil Rights Movement. Sit-ins, marches, freedom rides, and rallies pushed the limits of race relations in the nation and drove the government to institute necessary legislation against segregation.

Upstanders emerged to oppose hate, injustice, prejudice, and ignorance. People like Martin Luther King Jr., Rosa Parks, and Thurgood Marshall inspired others to stand up and fight for what they believed.

The Civil Rights Movement demanded that the treatment of minorities in America change. Current events bring home the point that this is a work in progress. The Museum special exhibits discussed here will inspire visitors to continue to stand up against injustice and hatred.

Sources:
http://hcl.harvard.edu/hfa/films/2015junaug/fuller.html
http://www.filmsite.org/bestdirs.html
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0828419/bio
http://www.vahistorical.org/collections-and-resources/virginia-history-explorer/civil-rights-movement-virginia/turning-point
http://www.pbs.org/thewar/at_home_civil_rights_minorities.htm
https://www.biography.com/people/john-ford-9298806
http://www.righttofightexhibit.org/home/

A special thank you to our exhibition sponsors and community partners:
Filming the Camps Sponsors: Visit Dallas, Memorial de la Shoah, SNCF, Republique Francaise.

Filming the Camps Community Partners: Denton Black Film, Dallas Jewish Film Festival, VideoFest and 3 Stars Cinema.

Fighting for the Right to Fight Sponsors: Visit Dallas, Office of Cultural Affairs City of Dallas, Fox Rothschild/Clint David, Dallas Managing Partner, The National WWII Museum, Wells Fargo, and Abbot Downing.

Fighting for the Right to Fight Community Partners:
Community Partners: African American Museum, Bishop Arts Theater Center, Claude R. Platte DFW Chapter of the Tuskegee Airmen,
Dallas Civil Rights Museum, Dallas County Community College District, Eastfield College History Department, Holy Cross Catholic
Church, Paul Quinn College, St. Paul United Methodist Church, St. Philip’s School and Community Center, Texas Center for African
American Studies at University of Texas at Arlington, University of North Texas, Veterans Resource Center, and Wilshire Baptist Church
Media Partners: Albert Outdoor Advertising, Efrogs, GospelConnection.com and KHVN Radio