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Recent News

Dear Fellow Supporters,

The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance has played an important role in our community for the past 32 years. Originally named the Holocaust Memorial Center and located on the ground floor of the Jewish Community Center, our mission was to keep alive the memory of those lost in the Holocaust. Today, our mission has expanded to include teaching the history of the Holocaust, and advancing human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference.

The Museum is currently in a rental location and no longer able to meet the demand of 80,000+ annual visitors from Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Oklahoma. Because of these severe space constraints, our board has launched a campaign to build a state-of-the-art, 50,000 square foot permanent home in the historic West End, the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum. This new Museum, with its dramatically larger facilities and expanded educational and
cultural programming, will galvanize the North Texas community to learn the lessons of the Holocaust to combat hatred and injustice.

Today we are at a crossroads. Thank you for helping us take the next step in our journey to be able to teach more teachers, educate more students, and ultimately transform Dallas into a city of Upstanders.

With great appreciation,
Campaign Cabinet Members of the "Building a Foundation of Hope” Campaign:
Co-chairs

Rebecca Fletcher Frank Risch Ron Steinhart

Members: Kenny Goldberg, Tom Halsey, Jim Hogue, Hylton Jonas, Stan Rabin, Larry Schoenbrun, Florence Shapiro, and Steve Waldman.
October 2016

Filming the Camps, From Hollywood to Nuremberg

Filming the Camps, From Hollywood to Nuremberg

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Viewable, February 16 - August 3, 2017.
The Nuremberg Trials in 1945 used an unprecedented form of evidence—film of the war and the liberation of concentration camps. The raw footage compiled into a documentary titled Nazi Concentration Camps, became crucial evidence, presenting the crimes the Nazis committed in an unflinching and authentic format to the court.

The exhibit, opening February 16, 2017, features the work of three filmmakers: John Ford, Samuel Fuller, and George Stevens. It explores the filmmakers’ experiences during and after World War II, the footage they captured of Nazi atrocities, and the impact the war had on their careers.

John Ford, director of films such as Stagecoach, The Grapes of Wrath, How Green Was My Valley, and The Quiet Man, commanded the Field Photographic Branch and made propaganda films for the U.S. Navy Department. He won back-to-back Academy Awards during this time for his documentaries, The Battle of Midway and December 7th.

George Stevens, known before the war for light-hearted musicals featuring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, joined the U.S. Army Signal Corps during World War II and headed a film unit under General Eisenhower. His unit shot footage documenting D-Day, the liberation of Paris, and horrific scenes of the infamous Dachau concentration camp. Following the war, Stevens’ films gravitated toward more serious subjects. He went on to direct the Academy-Award winning films Shane, Giant, and The Diary of Anne Frank.

Samuel Fuller served as a soldier in the 1st Infantry Division, nicknamed “The Big Red One.” He captured footage of the liberation of Falkenau, a sub-camp of the Flossenbürg concentration camp, under the orders of his captain with a camera Fuller’s mother sent him. After the war, Fuller directed many films including The Big Red One, based on his wartime experiences.

In 1945, Ford created a documentary of the war incorporating Stevens’ images of Dachau. The film, shown first to American audiences, was evidence of Nazi crimes at the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. Ford also documented the Nuremberg Trials.

The exhibition contains film and photographs of World War II as well as clips from the filmmakers’ pre-war careers.

The exhibition, curated by historian and film director Christian Delage, was designed, created, and distributed by the Mémorial de la Shoah (Paris, France), and made possible through the generous support of SNCF.

This presentation is sponsored by Visit Dallas, Mémorial de la Shoah (Paris, France), the Consulate General of France in Houston, the Embassy of France in the United States, and SNCF, and is on view at the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance February 16—August 3, 2017.

Survivor Speaker Series & Millennial Night #3

Survivor Speaker Series
Sunday, June 25 – Max Glauben
at the Museum, at 12:30 p.m. each day.

Join us to hear the testimonies of Holocaust survivors, refugees, and hidden children, as well as survivors of modern-day genocides. You will experience an unforgettable testimonies of survival and hope for humanity.
Free. Admission fees for Museum exhibits apply.

Millennial Month/Millennial Nights
Also if you are a Millennial Join use for one remaining Millennials-only evening on Tuesday, June 27 from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. for docent-led museum tours, food and beverages. FREE.

Note: During the entire month of June, the Museum will celebrate millennials by offering them free admission for a donation of any amount. Pay $10.00 or 10 cents!

All donations will be used towards the Museum Experience Fund. The Museum established the Museum Experience Fund in 2013 to pay for admission and transportation costs of low-income students from surrounding areas in 5th through 12th grade.

Also, join us for two remaining Millennials-only evenings on Tuesday, June 20 and Tuesday, June 27 from 6:00 - 8:00 p.m. for docent-led museum tours, food and beverages. FREE.

Your visit includes access to the Museum's permanent exhibit, One Day in the Holocaust: April 19, 1943, and the current special gallery exhibit, Filming the Camps: From Hollywood to Nuremberg.

----#MillennialMonth #InspiringUpstanders #DallasHolocaustMuseum

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An Evening with Dr. Donald Seldin (Location theater at The Hockaday School)

Note: New Location for An Evening with Dr. Donald Seldin;
Thursday, June 29, 2017 | Location: The Hockaday School, Nancy A. Nasher and David J. Haemisegger Family Center for the Arts, 6:30 p.m.
Our conversation with Dr. Donald Seldin, William Buchanan Professor of Internal Medicine at UT Southwestern Medical Center, will be moderated by Dr. Michael Emmett, Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Baylor University Medical Center.

Dr. Seldin, widely known as the Father of Dallas Medicine, had an exceptional beginning in the medical field. In 1947, as a recent medical school graduate and captain in the U.S. Army, Seldin was summoned to Dachau, where he testified as an expert witness in the trial of Nazi doctor accused of causing the deaths of some 15 inmates following the performance of liver biopsies without sterilization or anesthesia. The court found the defendant guilty of murder and sentenced him to death.

Dr. Seldin credits this experience for his dedication to the practice of humane medicine, which he has passed on to all of his students. Soon after his return to the U.S., Seldin moved to Dallas and helped transform a sleepy medical school into the world-class institution UT Southwestern Medical School is today.

Free. RSVP required through Eventbrite.

We are expanding our archives and you can help

The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance has commenced the planning process for a greatly expanded permanent exhibit, to be part of a future, new home for the Museum.

We want our exhibit to reflect the experiences of Holocaust survivors, refugees, hidden children, and liberators in North Texas. Thus, we would like to invite you to join us in launching our artifact campaign before the exhibit is fully designed. Of particular interest are documents, photos, artifacts, diaries, travel papers, art, clothing, or almost anything related to: pre-war Jewish life, survival experiences, life in the ghettos, camps, and forests, anti-Semitism, life in the DP camps, post-war resettlement, immigration and the rebirth and continued vitality of Jewish life after the war.

In this campaign, Dr. Sara Abosch Jacobson, our Senior Director of Education, will be the contact person. Please direct any inquiries, questions, and possibilities for artifact donations to her at: sabosch@dallasholocaustmuseum.org.
The list that follows contains examples of possible artifacts:
Pre-war life:
 Wedding contracts (ketubbot), Birth certificates, Smicha certificates
 Invitations to circumcisions, bar mitzvahs and weddings
 Hebrew textbooks, Jewish literature published in Hebrew or Yiddish
 Wedding canopies or talesim
 Posters for Jewish cultural events
 Objects related to holidays
 Chevra kadisha items
 Anti-Semitica
 School texts, report cards and diplomas
 Items related to occupations and professions
 Items related to communal and political organizations, such
as the Bund and Zionist organizations

Holocaust and WWII:
 Identification cards
 Programs and tickets from cultural events
 Deportation notices
 Kindertransport tags, tickets or diaries
 Stars and armbands
 Passports and documents marked with “J”
 Reflections of religious and cultural life and friendship and other objects made or used in ghettos and camps (musical instruments, ritual objects, scrapbooks, banners, diaries, newspapers, costumes, artwork, Bund, Zionist youth organization materials, etc.)
 Partisan related materials
 Objects, documents or postcards sent from ghettos
 Objects from the camps including uniforms and clothing, toys, kitchen utensils
 Artwork done by children in camps, ghettos, hiding or exile
 Materials relating to those who rescued, hid or saved Jews
 Materials relating to the G.I. European theatre experience
 Materials relating to the liberation of Holocaust victims

Survival and postwar resettlement in or emigration from Europe, and postwar cultural life:
 Objects from Displaced Persons camps
 Visas, immigration papers
 Items carried on board ships leaving Europe
 Items from Cyprus or otherwise reflecting immigration to Palestine
 Materials reflecting resettlement and the establishment of businesses
 Posters from cultural events
 Objects relating to resettlement in the DFW area and North Texas
 Items related to the recreation of postwar Jewish life (wedding invitations, marriage certificates, birth certificates)

Again, if you have any of the above items and would consider donating them to the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance, please contact Dr. Sara Abosch Jacobson, Senior Director of Education, 214-741-7500, or via email at: sabosch@dallasholocaustmuseum.org. Thank you for helping us to build for our collective future.

Murders of Upstanders in Portland

Public Statement

Two men in Portland, Oregon were brutally murdered on a commuter train, and another critically wounded, for standing up to protect two teenaged girls--one wearing a hijab and the other an African American. The girls were being debased and ridiculed by a man with known ties to hate groups. We are deeply saddened by the attack on these three Upstanders, resulting in the murders of Ricky John Best and Taliesin Myrddin Namkai-Meche. We send our deepest condolences to their families. We stand in solidarity with Upstanders like them who choose not to stand by. We remain confident in our commitment and belief that we all can combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference when we acknowledge the lessons of the past, embrace our differences, and, most importantly, view all of humanity as valuable.

iRead Book Club: Number the Stars by Lois Lowery
Noon at the Museum

IRead Book Club

iRead Book Club: Number the Stars by Lois Lowery

Monday, June 5, 2017 at the Museum, 12:00 p.m.
Join us as we read books that move us and explore key literary and
historical points. This month, we will discuss Number the Stars by
Lois Lowry. Open to Museum members and volunteers.
Free. RSVP to cdecoster@dallasholocaustmuseum.org.

Upstander Speaker Series 2017

Upstander Speaker: Dr. Mehnaz Afridi | May 10, 2017 | Director of Holocaust, Genocide and Inter Faith Center, Educator, Author| Location TBD
Dr. Afridi’s research aims to understand the relations between Muslims, Jews, and Christians and to promote an open interfaith dialogue between them. Raised in Western Europe and the Middle East, Dr. Afridi is a Muslim whose curiosity led her to question the reasons behind the racial and political tensions she witnessed between Jews and Muslims. Unfamiliar with the Holocaust, she studied under her professor during a teaching assistantship, and then delved further to learn about Judaism, the Holocaust, and the role of Muslims, Islamophobia and antisemitism. Her studies led her to Israel where she began interviewing Holocaust survivors to hear their stories and hardships. Dr. Afridi currently serves as Assistant Professor of Religious Studies and the Director of the Holocaust, Genocide and Interfaith Education Center at Manhattan College. Many of her publications focus on how her contemporaries expressed antisemitism. Her forthcoming book, Shoah Through Muslim Eyes, is based on her personal and academic journey into Judaism as a Muslim.

Upstander Speaker: Dr. Samantha Nutt | November 9, 2017 | Medical Doctor, Humanitarian, Author, Founder of War Child Canada and War Child USA | Location TBD
As a recent medical-school graduate in 1995, Dr. Nutt found work as a field volunteer with UNICEF in Baidoa, Somalia, alias “city of death.” Impassioned and emboldened by what she witnessed there, Dr. Nutt began her lifetime career as an advocate for children’s and women’s rights in major war zones around the world. From Iraq to Afghanistan, Somalia to the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Syria to Darfur, Sudan, Dr. Nutt has been on the frontlines of the world’s major conflict zones, and her work has helped thousands of children affected by war. Damned Nations: Greed, Guns, Armies, and Aid, Dr. Nutt’s critically-acclaimed debut book is a #1 bestseller. It combines original research with personal stories that span her career of hands-on care with children and families impacted by violence. She did this while founding the renowned global humanitarian organizations War Child Canada and War Child USA. A leading authority on war, current affairs and international policy, Dr. Nutt is one of the most fearless and recognized humanitarian speakers in the field.

Building a Foundation of Hope

In October of 2016, we announced our Capital Campaign to build a larger and state-of-the-art museum, with an expanded mission and scope--the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum.
Media Contact:
Paula Nourse
Director of Marketing and Communications
O: 469.399.5201 or M: 214.906.8314

Dallas Holocaust Museum to Build New
State-of-the-Art Museum in Downtown Dallas

The Museum will have a new name—Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum—and an expanded mission to teach the history of the Holocaust and advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference at a time when Texas leads the nation in the number of active hate groups.

The new 50,000-square-foot museum will accommodate more than 200,000 visitors a year, and more than quadruple its exhibition space.

PRESS RELEASE
DALLAS, Oct. 27, 2016—The Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance today announced that it will build a new permanent home in the West End Historic District of downtown Dallas.

The new museum will bear a new name – the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum – and an expanded mission. It will be built on property owned by the Museum near Houston Street and the DART Rail corridor on Pacific Avenue, presently a parking lot, diagonally across from the Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza.

“At a time when Texas leads the nation in the number of active hate groups, and the Dallas community is still healing from the July 7th attack on local law enforcement officers, the most violent and hateful act against law enforcement officers since 9/11, we believe the mission of the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum is more important than ever,” said Museum President and CEO Mary Pat Higgins.

“The Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum will become an architectural icon in downtown Dallas, engaging 21st century audiences by dramatically expanding educational programming,” said Frank Risch, Campaign Co-chair. “The state-of-the-art, 50,000-square-foot museum will accommodate more than 200,000 visitors a year, half of whom will be school students. It will also more than quadruple its current exhibit space,” he said.

The new museum is being designed by Omniplan Architects and the permanent exhibition is being designed by Berenbaum Jacobs Associates, under the stewardship of Michael Berenbaum, the former Project Director of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum on the Washington D.C. Mall.

The new museum will be unique among the nation’s 21 Holocaust-related museums. In addition to a clear focus on the Holocaust, it will feature new exhibit galleries on human rights and American ideals. It will also feature modern, immersive and interactive content and technology along with an original boxcar used by the Nazis during the Holocaust to transport Jews and others. It will include a 250-seat theater, new classrooms, an expanded library and archive, modern technology throughout, additional staffing, and a special reflection and memorial area for visitors.

“We need a place that allows us to have a discussion about what human rights, diversity, and respect for others mean for our city today,” said Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings.

The Museum has already raised two thirds of the funds it needs to start construction, which will take about two years to complete. More than $43 million has been raised of the $61 million budget. To raise additional funds, the Museum is launching the “Building a Foundation of Hope” capital campaign. Construction will begin as soon as remaining needed funds are raised, Higgins said.

“We have run out of space in our tiny current rented facility,” said Higgins. “We are limited in the number of visitors we can see at one time, and many schools and thousands of students are not able to visit as their class sizes are too large for our current museum. We have been forced to move many of our events to other venues. These are all wonderful problems to have, but we urgently have to address our community’s need for education surrounding the history of the Holocaust and its all too relevant lessons. This need has led our board to unanimously approve the ‘Building a Foundation of Hope’ capital campaign to create the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum.”

Ann and Nate Levine, the new museum’s most generous donors, have stated that “Education is at the heart of everything the Museum does. Our goal is to change behavior by raising awareness of the dangers of prejudice, hatred, and injustice and what happens when people don’t stand up to threats against humanity.” The Levines also note that “the new museum will focus on Upstanders—those individuals who stand up to prejudice, hatred, and indifference—and whose efforts inspire us to make a difference in our community and world.”

The Museum recently commissioned an independent academic study to gauge the impact that a visit to the Museum has on students and educators. The results make very clear that student attitudes and tolerance levels are strongly impacted by Museum visits:
• Understanding that passive actions/bystander behavior have negative impacts increased by 56.8% for middle school and 31.1% for high school students
• Capacity to examine their own behaviors increased by 19.4% in middle school and 15.7% in high school students
• 83.3% of teachers said students are more willing to stand up for others
Roger Staubach, former Dallas Cowboys quarterback, honoree of the Museum’s 2010 Hope for Humanity award dinner, and long-time Museum supporter, says “We need to take the next step for all the people of Dallas to be able to teach more teachers, to educate more students, and ultimately transform Dallas into a city of Upstanders. This new museum will continue to showcase Dallas as a beacon of hope for our nation and our world.”

The Museum has played an important role in the community for the past 32 years. The new museum, with its dramatically larger facilities and expanded educational and cultural programming, will galvanize North Texans to learn and understand the lessons of the Holocaust, thereby combating hatred and injustice.

The Museum is grateful for the following leadership gifts to the “Building a Foundation of Hope” campaign to create the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum (as of print date):

Capital Campaign Donors Include:

$1,000,0000-$2,999,999: Edward and Wilhelmina Ackerman Family Foundation; Alon USA Energy, Inc.; Janet and Jeffrey Beck; The Brown Family; Cinemark; Cynthia and Robert Feldman; Funk Families; Estate of Lilian Furst; Glazer Family; Lisa and Neil Goldberg; Sherry and Kenny Goldberg; Dot and Basil Haymann; The Hirsch Family Foundation; Helen and Frank Risch; Simmons Sisters Fund; Donna and Herbert Weitzman; Peggy and Mark Zilbermann; $3,000,0000-$4,999,999: Carol and Steve Aaron; $10,000,000: Ann and Nate Levine.

To learn more about the “Building a Foundation of Hope” capital campaign, please contact Mary Pat Higgins at (214) 741-7500. For additional information about the new Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum, please visit: DallasHolocaustMuseum.org.

About the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance
The Dallas Holocaust Museum’s mission is to teach the history of the Holocaust and advance human rights to combat prejudice, hatred, and indifference. The Museum’s educational and cultural programs have a profound effect on people of all ages. In 2016, over 80,000 visitors will tour the Museum. Many write that their lives have been transformed by the experience. Our exhibits and programs convey the lessons of the Holocaust including the horrors brought on by unchecked discrimination and deep-rooted hatred which led to the attempted annihilation of the Jews and the systematic persecution of others. Visitors also learn about human and civil rights, their centrality to our democracy, and their vital importance in preventing events like those of the Holocaust from happening again.

The Museum is located at 211 N. Record Street, Dallas, Texas 75202. Hours are Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, please visit DallasHolocaustMuseum.org or call (214) 741-7500.

Film Screening: Sunday, March 26. 2 p.m. @ Museum December 7th (Pearl Harbor)

Film Screening: December 7th
Sunday, March 26, 2017 | at the Museum, 2:00 p.m.
As a follow-up to our screening of They Were Expendable, we will
feature John Ford’s Academy Award-winning propaganda film,
December 7th. Parts of the original film were considered unpatriotic
and edited out; we will show the original, uncensored version.
Free, RSVP required through Eventbrite.

Dallas Holocaust Museum Presents April 19, 1943: One Day in the Holocaust
Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | at Museum at 2:00 p.m.
Join us as we bring attention to April 19, 1943, the focal point of the Museum’s core exhibit. The event will feature a talk by Jack Repp, Holocaust survivor, and light refreshments. This event is included in the cost of admission.

One Day During the Holocaust

Wednesday, April 19, 2017 | at Museum at 2:00 p.m.
Join us as we bring attention to April 19, 1943, the focal point of the Museum’s core exhibit. The event will feature a talk by Jack Repp, Holocaust survivor, and light refreshments. This event is included in the cost of admission.

Civil Discourse Panel Discussion on Capital Punishment
This session, we will discuss the death penalty in the U.S.
Join us as we gather a panel of experts to discuss all sides of this divisive topic.

Civil Discourse Series Event: Death Penalty

Civil Discourse Panel Discussion on Capital Punishment
This session, we will discuss the death penalty in the U.S.
Thursday, May 25, 2017 | At the Museum | 6:30 p.m.
Join us as we gather a panel of experts to discuss all sides of this divisive topic.
The Civil Discourse Series presents all sides of a
thought-provoking topic through respectful discussion.
For each event, the Museum will convene a panel of subject matter
experts to represent their unique perspectives on
an issue related to human and civil rights.

Panelists include:
Dr. Rick Halperin, Director, SMU Embrey Human Rights Program
Jim Willett, Director, Texas Prison Museum, Former Warden of Texas State Penitentiary at Hunstville ("Walls" Unit)
Dudley Sharp, Independent Pro-Death Penalty Expert and Victims' Rights Advocate
Moderator: Dr. Sara Abosch-Jacobson, Senior Director of Education at the Museum

Free, RSVP required through Eventbrite.